365 Ways to Attract Good Luck by Richard Webster

365 Ways to Attract Good Luck by Richard Webster

Luck, so the saying goes, is something that you’ve either got or you ain’t!

Everyone knows someone who seems to be endlessly, and annoyingly, blessed in the good fortune department. These are those people who appear to draw toward them universal benevolence wherever they go.

Conversely. we also know of others who struggle through life with few breaks or opportunities presenting themselves along the way.

The question that inevitably springs to mind is “Is luck a power that we are born with or is it something that we learn along the way?”

Most self-made entrepreneurs argue that there is no such thing as luck—that what made them successful was not good fortune but hard work and dedication.

The successful author Richard Webster believes that luck is a dynamic that we can all create with a little insight into the workings of human psychology and the Laws of the Universe.

In 365 Ways to Attract Good Luck, Richard Webster takes a light-hearted look at the process of creating luck—some of which rely on positive-thinking, others on a little traditional Magick and Folklore.

Webster opens the book byreinforcing his belief in the power of mind, positive attitude and a healthy sense of expectation and gratitude as key features in creating and maintaining a life of good fortune and benevolence.

In part two, he explores some more traditional ideas about fortune and how to attract it. These include the use of lucky words, crystals and gem stones as well as a multitude of traditional lucky charms.

In part three, the author explores the influence of good fortune in love and marriage. It includes a brief section on de-cluttering and drawing good energy into your home using Feng Shui. He also looks at the changing seasons of the year and the effect of lucky days months and leap years.

Part four focuses on folklore beliefs about luck and good fortune with an expose of lucky animals and birds. He also identifies lucky food beliefs from around the world and where they have appeared throughout history.

Webster then looks at the good luck beliefs of the people of the Far East—a land where belief in benevolent forces and the flow of the natural order of things is strongest. He looks at the Chinese animals of their particular brand of astrology, flowers and totem images such as the Laughing Buddha.

The book concludes with an expose of the folklore of the West with their traditions of lucky habits, actions and omens such as lucky rainbows.

The book closes with a recommended reading list and notes section.

Our Review of 365 Ways to Attract Good Luck by Richard Webster

This is a somewhat light and frivolous look at good luck. It is not meant to be a serious manual of personal transformation.

In it, the writer does an interesting job of charting the history of good luck beliefs from around the World. Some of them are darn-right barmy, others are clearly born from a more superstitious age.

Whether this book actually has the power to change your luck is questionable. I guess its effectiveness is essentially determined by your personal beliefs.

If carrying lucky charms works for you, this book will provide some excellent guidance. It will also be great for those who believe in lucky omens and insights from dreams. For others, like myself, and, incidentally, the author as well, who believe we make our own luck through the way we live, it only serves up a lighter morsel of entertainment.

Our Rating

3/5

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