The Physics of God by Joseph Selbie

The Physics of God by Joseph Selbie

Almost one hundred years ago mankind rather unwittingly discovered that that light can behave either as a particle or a wave. What was most astounding about this discovery was that scientists realised that light only behaves like a stream of particles in the presence of an intelligent observer. The result of this revelation has come to be known as ‘quantum physics’ and is the first quantifiable bridge between the world of physics and spirituality. In his book The Physics Of God writer and teacher Joseph Selbie investigates the intersection of…

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The Secret Nature of Matter by Richard Gordon

The Secret Nature of Matter by Richard Gordon

Richard Gordon likes to play around with life. He also likes to provide himself, and others, with proof that the rules he plays by are both tangible and verifiable. In his book The Secret Nature of Matter Gordon shares fifty-eight of his mind-magic experiments along with their modus operandi and observed outcomes. Gordon is a friend of natural curiosity and the enemy of chance. The Journey Begins In The Secret Nature of Matter the author opens by describing his book as existing between the seemingly opposing polarities of science and…

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Solar Revolution (English Translation) by Dieter Broers

Solar Revolution by Dieter Broers

Cultures all over the world have worshiped this stellar body ever since the dawn of man. However, as science begins to understand the role of the Sun as the central point in our Solar System, it becomes evident that its ancient mystical secrets could reveal the destiny of humanity. The scientific establishment is increasingly interested in the impact the Sun has upon this planet and its potential ability to destroy our electronic systems. As modern society grows more reliant on electric power to function, negative impacts on our electromagnetic spectrum…

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The Velikovsky Heresies by Laird Scranton

The Velikovsky Heresies by Laird Scranton

Two of the first books I ever read on alternative history were Immanuel Velikovsky’s ‘Worlds in Collision’ (1950) and his follow-up Ages in Chaos (1952). I still recall the thrill of excitement that I felt reading the challenging astronomical ideas his books presented. In a time when information was strictly disseminated by a tightly-controlled scientific and religious order, Velikovsky’s ideas were a breath of fresh air. Then, despite the publication of other titles, such as Earth in Upheaval and Peoples of the Sea, interest in Velikovsky—a man whom Carl Sagan described…

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