Mindful Money by Jonathan K. DeYoe

Mindful Money by Jonathan K Deyoe

Being wealthy might not make you happy but it is near impossible to make money unless you do so by focusing upon happiness first.

Such is the tenet of Buddhist and financial advisor Jonathan DeYoe who, in his book Mindful Money sets out to guide his readers through the intricacies, obstacles, challenges and pitfalls of wealth creation.

In his book DeYoe poses that fundamental question that everyone working a spiritual path has had to face at one time or another which is “How do we develop a serene relationship with money in such a nonserene world?

Facing Illusions

Mindful Money offers a discourse on money management and a personalised guide within the somewhat confounding world of financial products and fiscal planning strategies.

Divided into three sections DeYoe’s book unravels the intricacies that link money and personal happiness and how you can amass personal wealth in ways that avoid compromising yourself in the process.

In Part One ‘Unmasking the Illusions’ the author fronts the often painful and challenging obstacles that we can face in running our finances successfully in later life. The heart of these difficulties are often borne from the erroneous ideas and concepts regarding our own financial self-worth as children.

In Part Two ‘Finding Your Happiness’ the author explores what he refers to as “happiness pillars”. These range from health and relationships through to generosity and gratitude.

Part Three ‘Making a Plan’ cements the relationship between money and happiness and directs the reader into the process of “launching your dreams into action.”

All of which references the subtle connection between life, oneself and our financial future.

As the author points out in his closing remarks. “When you take the minimal money steps required for financial success, you free up the forces of growth to do their own thing. And they will. “

Our Review of Mindful Money by Jonathan K DeYoe

Money can often blind us from the task of assessing exactly who we are and what it is that we want out of life. Mindful Money is a salutary reminder that we need to understand that as individuals we are the value of the assets that we accumulate.

This is also a book that weaves a somewhat convoluted way through a variety of subjects regarding investment within ourselves as well as financial commitments geared towards ensuring our future.

Its crossover between hardcore consideration of the role of money plays in our lives pitched against our more aesthetic values occasionally work fairly effectively from the perspective of a reader and financial investor but at other times they only seem to confuse and confound. The result is a book that is a little patchy and which covers a lot of ground without actually saying much.

Ultimately it is difficult to be overly critical of a book such as this but I did feel that it failed in providing any real, practical and useful financial guidance but overall how well this book speaks to you is, I guess, is determined by how relevant the approach that the author takes is to your circumstances.

At times it reads more like a commentary on the subject with the result that the author all too often often makes generalised statements that I felt are too weak and which carry little sustenance.

Nevertheless Mindful Money is an interesting and thoughtful reflection upon the world of personal wealth creation and accumulation. It does not draw greatly from Buddhist practice and principles and overall I would have liked the book to have had more of an emphasis on that part of the author’s work.

Those who feel they have lost their souls to chasing wealth and who, as a result, have become slaves to money rather than freed by it will appreciate the book’s specific approach to life, happiness and the pursuit of material security.

Our Rating

3/5

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