The Art of Money by Bari Tessler

The Art of Money by Bari Tessler

How good are you with money? Do you treat it with deep respect and care or are you rash and unrestrained in your spending?

Money is one of the few areas of life that we are never really in control – for the most part it controls us.

In her book The Art of Money money-management expert Bari Tessler explores the often taboo subject of money and helps her readers to better understand the personal relationships that we have with it – from practical through to emotional.

A Structured Approach

The book is split into three specific parts with each one detailing a particular phase on the goal towards better money management.

In the first section, titled ‘Money Healing’ Tessler reveals encourages her readership to face-up to the specific relationship they might have developed with Money creation. She considers the specific psycho-emotional dynamics that tend to underpin most people’s attitudes towards money.

In the section part of ‘The Art of Money’ the author drills down deeper into the practical ways by which you can handle, control, engage with and focus upon better money management.

The third part, titled Money Maps’, utilises advanced financial accountancy techniques such as those offered by good book-keeping, awareness of personal income and expense, and other money areas such as saving and investment.

Our Review of The Art of Money by Bari Tessler

This is a book about money management for those who already have a good professional income to work with – which somewhat limits its range of interest.

Rather than providing practical advice or guidance to those who are either on the breadline or who want to understand how to increase the flow of wealth into their lives this focuses solely upon those who find issues with controlling what they already have.

As a result the book tends to both teach and preach fundamental money-management techniques that to many impoverished readers are obvious to anyone who is currently struggling with a fixed or limited budget.

However, if you find it difficult to deal with the challenges of successful money management then this is a book with some good, solid and uncompromising advice.

Its inclusion of personal anecdotal stories adds an interesting flavour to the book and most readers will quickly identify with the issues that the author raises.

Would I recommend the book to anyone except comfortable middle-class Americans? Possibly not, for I found it in places to be rather flowery in its use of unorthodox terminology and in places somewhat patronising in its teaching.

Neither of these translate well in terms that are understandable to those not brought up with the principles that underpin the American Dollar and its inherent financial structuring.

Our Rating

3/5

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